Welcome to dmuth.org!

Welcome to my website and blog! It has been been around in one form or another for well over a decade. It’s changed purposes a few times, and at this point is now a mostly tech blog where I share things I’ve learned or made. Feel free to have a look around, or consider checking out some of the more popular posts I’ve made over the years:

“Who disturbs my nap?”

Thanks for visiting, and feel free to reach out if you have any comments or just want to chat!

SSH At Scale: CAs and Principals

If you manage Linux servers over the Internet, you use SSH to connect to them. SSH lets you have a remote shell on a host over an encrypted channel so that an attacker cannot watch what you are doing over the network. In this blog post, I’m going to talk about using SSH at scale across thousands of posts.

Phase 0: Passwords

When you get started with SSH for the first time, you likely won’t have keys set up and will instead use passwords to authenticate to your servers. It will look something like this:

ssh dmuth@cheetah.dmuth.org
dmuth@cheetah.dmuth.org's passsword: ********
$ 

You use SSH to connect to the server, type in your password, and you’re good to go. That’s fine for small scale, such as managing a single server, but it doesn’t come without downsides. Specifically, you won’t be able to easily use a tool such as Ansible nor do code checkins with Git.

And that’s actually a bigger problem than it sounds, because if you make it harder to use a tool, that tool will be used far less often. This can lead to things such as configuration drift due to Ansible being run less often, or giant code pushes happening once a day if Git is being run less. And giant code pushes are a particular problem, because if other engineers have written code, you’ll have to do a merge, and if a bug presents itself, you’ll now have to think back to what you did 8 hours ago, not 8 minutes ago. Having to type in a password every single time will also slow down the rate of deployment, which in turn slows down the rate of product releases. Not good.

Seriously, don’t use SSH with a password for any reason other than as a stepping step to using keys. And that brings us to…

Continue reading “SSH At Scale: CAs and Principals”

Staying Safe Online: A Guide for Beginners and Non-Technical People

Perhaps you’re worried about being doxxed, perhaps you’ve received some specific threats, maybe you just want to increase your security. No matter the reason, this article is for you! Below I will list a collection of good practices to keep you and your accounts safe online. I fully expect to update this post as things change in the future.

I have tried to put things in a logical order, with some later steps depending on earlier steps, and some things that may be considered “controversial” towards the end.

This post was last updated on Jan 2, 2020.


Passwords

Let’s start with passwords. I shouldn’t have to say this, but I will do so anyway: do not reuse passwords. Reusing passwords mean that if a single account provider is breached and your plaintext password is recovered, you now have additional accounts at risk of compromise. This has happened before.

Anyone in a hoodie is NOT to be trusted.

I recommend using a password manager such as LastPass to keep track of your passwords. While having your passwords stored in an app that uploads them somewhere increases your risk slightly, I feel it is outweighed by using a different password for each service. For passwords themselves, you can use random characters or a system such as Diceware to create long passwords that are easier to remember. While the latter is slightly less secure, a password that can be remembered is one less password to store into a password manager.

Continue reading “Staying Safe Online: A Guide for Beginners and Non-Technical People”